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Slow-Roasted Shoulder of Lamb Recipe

Slow-Roasted Shoulder of Lamb Recipe

I love lamb, and this slow roasted shoulder of lamb is pretty much as good as it gets. I know lamb is often criticised because it can be quite fatty, but if you ask a butcher to remove as much of the unnecessary fat as he can then you will be left with more of the meat and less of the waste. Failing that, take a good, sharp knife to the joint and you can remove most of it yourself. Don’t go too crazy though – a bit of fat on the meat is a good thing.

Ingredients

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  • Shoulder of lamb (bone in) with some unnecessary fat removed.
  • Rosemary (3-4 full stems)
  • 2 Lamb Stock Cubes
  • 3 Bulbs of Garlic
  • 1 Onion
  • Grass Fed Butter

How-to Guide

  • When the lamb has been prepared (some fat removed), allow to reach room temperature.
  • Prepare the butter mixture by mixing the garlic, butter, 1 stem of rosemary leaves and the stock cubes. I like to do this in a pestle and mortar as I want the garlic to be kept in relatively big chunks so it doesn’t burn in the oven.

Slow-Roasted Shoulder of Lamb, www.hoylesfitness.com, Paleo, Cooking, recipe, Paleo Recipe, Shoulder of Lamb, Food, Ingredients

  • Next step, rub the butter all over the lamb, coating it thoroughly. This will ensure the meat is kept moist and is well seasoned.

Slow-Roasted Shoulder of Lamb, www.hoylesfitness.com, Paleo, Cooking, recipe, Paleo Recipe, Shoulder of Lamb, Food, Ingredients, Personal Trainer Stockport, The Handy Plan, Weight Loss Stockport

  • When the lamb has been coated with the flavoured butter, cover with foil and place in the oven at 130 degrees Celsius.
  • Every hour, turn the meat over and re-baste with the juices and flavoured butter.

Slow-Roasted Shoulder of Lamb, www.hoylesfitness.com, Paleo, Cooking, recipe, Paleo Recipe, Shoulder of Lamb, Food, Ingredients, Personal Trainer Stockport, The Handy Plan, Weight Loss Stockport

  • After around three hours of cooking time, cut the onion into strips (easily done – cut into rings and then cut the ring at a single point.

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  • Remove the lamb, mix the rings with the cooking juices and replace the lamb. Re-cover the meat and continue the slow cooking.

Slow-Roasted Shoulder of Lamb, www.hoylesfitness.com, Paleo, Cooking, recipe, Paleo Recipe, Shoulder of Lamb, Food, Ingredients, Personal Trainer Stockport, The Handy Plan, Weight Loss Stockport

  • After another couple of hours at a low heat, remove the lamb from the oven. Take the bone out (it should pull out easily) and carve the meat – it should fall apart easily. 

Slow-Roasted Shoulder of Lamb, www.hoylesfitness.com, Paleo, Cooking, recipe, Paleo Recipe, Shoulder of Lamb, Food, Ingredients, Personal Trainer Stockport, The Handy Plan, Weight Loss Stockport

  • After the long cooking time, the meat is nicely dark (not burnt) and the onions are naturally caramelised. The cooking juices can be drizzled over vegetables you might serve the meat with, or be saved and used for another meal.

Give this slow-roasted shoulder of lamb a try – its the best you will ever have! Don’t limit this way of cooking lamb to just the shoulder – leg of lamb works just as well this way too! You could also experiment with different flavours – curry, for example.

I served this with roasted vegetables, but it would be great as part of a Sunday roast and would also work really well with salad.

Just remember to make sure the meat still has the bone in – this helps provide great flavour, is an excellent conductor of heat to cook the inside of the meat and is an easy handle when it comes to turning the joint!

Enjoy!

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HoylesFitness

Owner of www.hoylesfitness.com. Personal Trainer, Father and fitness copy writer. Working hard making the world fitter and healthier!

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